Alien: Covenant

Alien: Covenant

Rating: 2.5/5

From IMDB:

The crew of a colony ship, bound for a remote planet, discover an uncharted paradise with a threat beyond their imagination, and must attempt a harrowing escape.

Review:

What on earth happened here? I find it so difficult to believe the same director was behind this movie and the original Alien.

Alien: Covenant was visually stunning but sadly lacked so badly plot-wise.

The set up of the characters were disheartening to say the list. They seem not to have one scientific bone in their bodies, save for the occasional comment scientific-ish character. There was certainly not enough to match to the original one, where Ripley just blew everyone away. I found everyone in the movie so forgettable, except for the androids.

That crew makes the most ridiculous decisions. I don’t understand why they would leave the ship without a protective suit, for one. Let alone all the silliness that ensued. They don’t seem to question anything, save for a remark of how there was absolute silence – no birds, no bugs, nothing – just thrown out there and then quickly forgotten. They just keep hiking along in search of the mysterious sign they picked up while on board the main ship.

I also did not like how the creature that burst out of the host’s chest was changed. Not only was it obviously fake but it made more sense that it would evolve from that worm-like state – it still gives me chills thinking of the discarded skin, like a snake.

The reveal at the end was beyond obvious and I really wish the movie had ended there. But sadly they had to keep it open for a sequel.

The entire movie lacked finesse, tension, build-up. In the end I enjoyed it more due to the psychological horror achieved by Michael Fassbender’s superb performance and the stunning visuals. I am fairly confident that the few glimpses I will save from this film are David’s expressions and postures.

Mr Make Believe

Title: Mr Make Believe

Author: Beezy Marsh

Genres: Contemporary | Humour | Romance

Length: 344 pages | 4366 Kindle locations

Source: Netgalley

Publisher: Ipso Books

Publishing Date: Apr 25th, 2017

Rating: 2.5/5

Premise:

Marnie Marlin gave up her career as a journalist to take care of her children and her home. However, her life is not fulfilling and her increasingly distant husband isn’t helping her already low self-esteem.
To help cope, Marnie creates a blog where she takes on the role of Mrs Make Believe. What started out as a hobby will bring huge changes to her life.

Review:

Mr Make Believe is told in a very light way and I am sure pretty much any woman will relate to at least some of it.

It was entertaining but at times I was annoyed by Marnie and how her children played such a small part in her life. She actually sounded much younger, not in her young fourties, and all the ‘but he/she doesn’t like me’ and the ‘woe me I am so fat’ sort of thoughts really got old after a while.

The writing confused me at times, as it was difficult to tell how time elapsed. Also, some expressions were quite repetitive (particularly toned or perfect figures) and several things just not believable at all.

You will probably enjoy Mr Make Believe if you are looking for a light read that addresses the possibility of your fantasies coming true.

Disclaimer: I would like to thank the publisher and Netgalley for providing me a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

Read from May 30th to Jun 4th, 2017
GR Review

Stacking The Shelves [16] June 3rd

sts3

Stacking The Shelves is hosted at Tynga’s Reviews and is all about sharing the books you are adding to your shelves, may it be physical or virtual. This means you can include books you buy in physical store or online, books you borrow from friends or the library, review books, gifts and of course ebooks!


Perhaps you noticed I didn’t post STS last week; that’s because I actually did not any books to my shelves during that entire week. Work has kept me busy so I was not been able to browse for books which had the upside of slowly but steadily building my Netgalley feedback rate.

This week I managed to get only one new book so I’d say I am on a good path to get closer to the elusive 80% rate!


Netgalley ARC

The Child by Fiona Barton

The Child
by Fiona Barton

As an old house is demolished in a gentrifying section of London, a workman discovers a tiny skeleton, buried for years. For journalist Kate Waters, it s a story that deserves attention. She cobbles together a piece for her newspaper, but at a loss for answers, she can only pose a question: Who is the Building Site Baby?

As Kate investigates, she unearths connections to a crime that rocked the city decades earlier: A newborn baby was stolen from the maternity ward in a local hospital and was never found. Her heartbroken parents were left devastated by the loss.

But there is more to the story, and Kate is drawn house by house into the pasts of the people who once lived in this neighborhood that has given up its greatest mystery. And she soon finds herself the keeper of unexpected secrets that erupt in the lives of three women and torn between what she can and cannot tell.


And that’s it for this week!

Have you read this book or do you plan to?

Are you excited about reading any particular books you got this week?

Please comment below and if you have a STS post please post it in comments.

Tackling the TBR [5]: June 2017

Note: The covers link to GR book page.

Click the image to go to The Obsessive Bookseller

Click to go to The Obsessive Bookseller


However you put together your TBR for the next month, the goal is to reduce the amount of obligation in reading and increase the fun.

Here’s a look at how the system works:

1. Identify the titles that take top priority in your TBR.
2. Combine them all in your own Tackling the TBR post.
3. Throughout the month pick from that pile as the mood strikes you.


Luckily I did not add too many books to my pile last month so I am slowly gaining control over my TBR pile.

I need to catch up on my paperbacks, which I plan to do this week since I will be away from work, yay!

Looking forward to some quality reading time and lots of peace and quiet.


June 2017 TBR Tackler Shelf:

The Things We Thought We Knew by Mahsuda Snaith

The Things We Thought We Knew
by Mahsuda Snaith

Lying to Children by Alex Shahla

Lying to Children
by Alex Shahla

Borne by Jeff VanderMeer

Borne
by Jeff VanderMeer

CONDITION - Book One: A Medical Miracle? by Alec Birri

CONDITION – Book One: A Medical Miracle?
by Alec Birri

Narcissism for Beginners - A Novel by Martine McDonagh

Narcissism for Beginners – A Novel
by Martine McDonagh

Quinsey Wolfe's Glass Vault (Glass Vault #1) by Candace Robinson

Quinsey Wolfe’s Glass Vault (Glass Vault #1)
by Candace Robinson


Tackler Carry-overs:

Girl Last Seen by Nina Laurin

Girl Last Seen
by Nina Laurin

The Ghost of Robert Brown: A Mystery Novel by P. Wish

The Ghost of Robert Brown: A Mystery Novel
by P. Wish

All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai

All Our Wrong Todays
by Elan Mastai

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng (

Little Fires Everywhere
by Celeste Ng

Every Last Lie by Mary Kubica

Every Last Lie
by Mary Kubica

Red Ribbons (Dr. Kate Pearson #1) by Louise Phillips

Red Ribbons (Dr. Kate Pearson #1)
by Louise Phillips

 The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

The Night Circus
by Erin Morgenstern

 The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North

The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August
by Claire North

Seven Suspects by Renee James

Seven Suspects
by Renee James

Elle by Philippe Djian

Elle
by Philippe Djians

The Fear by Rae Louise

The Fear
by Rae Louise

When I Wake Up by Jessica Jarlvi

When I Wake Up
by Jessica Jarlvi

Don't Wake Up by Liz Lawler

Don’t Wake Up
by Liz Lawler

The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman

The Light Between Oceans
by M.L. Stedman

Hollow City (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children #2) by Ransom Riggs

Hollow City (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children #2)
by Ransom Riggs

Library of Souls (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children #3)

Library of Souls (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children #3)
by Ransom Riggs

Holding: A Novel by Graham Norton

Holding: A Novel
by Graham Norton

May 2017 Wrap-Up

May was such a full month. Maybe because of that I was beginning to wonder if it would ever end!

A lot of responsibilities at work but also chances to unwind and relax so overall a good one.

They were all pretty long books, most over 400 pages, and the last one dragged on, so even though I had hoped to squeeze in one more read I think I did pretty well regardless, considering how crazy it has been at work.

AND I reached my Netgalley & Edelweiss challenge goal, woohoo!

May was pretty darn awesome.


Summary:

Total Books Read: 7

Longest Read: The Follower and The Teacher’s Secret (432 pages)

Shortest Read: Waking Gods (Themis Files #2) (320 pages)

Book of the Month: Waking Gods (Themis Files #2)

Favourite Cover:

Challenges Progress:

GoodReads: 40/52

British Books Challenge: 22/12

2017 Netgalley & Edelweiss: 35/35


May Books:

 

I began the month with The Marsh King’s Daughter, by Karen Dionne and boy, what a start.

Reading about a woman who spent her childhood growing up in the marsh with a man who abducted her mother at 14 was never going to be easy but I really appreciate what the author managed to accomplish with this book. It is quite profound and I recommend it if you are able to deal with some pretty heavy stuff.

I rated it 4.25/5 stars.

 

Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig was such a tender and emotional story about an autistic teenager with a huge heart who never ever lies with her mouth. It’s amazing what difference a few nods will do in her life.

I think this novel accurately addressed the stress dealing with such a person can be and also the amazing potential they have to love and be loved.

I rated it 4.25/5 stars.

 

I moved on to The Follower, by Koethi Zan.

I found it dragged on and I could not take to any of the characters. I did not find them interesting nor was invested in finding out what happened to them. There were a few engaging snippets but overall I don’t really recommend it.

I rated it 2/5 stars.

 

The Darkest Lies by Barbara Copperthwaite had the potential to be an amazing, heartbreaking story but I feel it tried to be too much in one book and that it dragged on, so I didn’t much enjoy it…

I rated it 2.75/5 stars.

 

Waking Gods (Themis Files #2), by Sylvain Neuvel was SO good, even better than the first book.

I was not keen on a couple of things but it didn’t put much of a dent on my overwhelmed enjoyment. I highly recommend this series.

I rated it 4.5/5 stars.

 

My Sister’s Bones by Nuala Ellwood was interesting enough but I was annoyed by the main character and tired due to the twist and turns the book would constantly take. I actually found the reveal interesting, though partly expected, so that I finished the book more intrigued than during the first half or so.

I rated it 3.5/5 stars.

 

I struggled with The Teacher’s Secret, by Suzanne Leal because there were too many characters and the pace was slow.

Still the book was well written, and if you can keep up with the pace it will be an enjoyable read, just don’t expect major twists.

I rated it 2.5/5 stars.

 

 


Where I got the books:

Edelweiss

  • The Marsh King’s Daughter

 

Netgalley

  • The Original Ginny Moon
  • The Follower
  • The Darkest Lies
  • Waking Gods (Themis Files #2)
  • My Sister’s Bones
  • The Teacher’s Secret

 

Movie Reviews:

 

Features:

 

Reblogs:

  • International Kindle Paperwhite Giveaway
  •  

    Other Posts in May:

     


    How was May for you?
    Do you have a Wrap-up post? Please link it below!

    The Teacher’s Secret

    Title: The Teacher’s Secret

    Author: Suzanne Leal

    Genres: Contemporary | Mystery

    Length: 432 pages | 5472 Kindle locations

    Source: Netgalley

    Publisher: Legend Press

    Publishing Date: May 15th, 2017

    Rating: 2.5/5

    Premise:

    A new year begins at Brindle Public School, which has a new acting principal. This change will bring about the unravelling of several characters, who will see their secrets exposed.

    Review:

    The Teacher’s Secret was tough to get into. There were so many characters that I could never remember who was who anymore. Let’s just say I was happy to have read this on my Kindle, where I could do a quick search to remind me. But yes, I did not find it very engaging and was beginning to wonder if I would finish it before the end of the month.

    Not only are there a lot of characters but also many perspectives, too many. I think we follow at least 5 or 6 characters as main ones, learning about who they were, their routines and the people in their lives. I found that very exhausting and several of them did not add anything to the story.

    Rebecca for instance, as well as her family and background, are utterly pointless to the narrative. Don’t get me wrong, I thought her characterisation was very well done and think she would be fine in a separate book, not just this one. As it is, it feels that the character was added to the book just so the author could write about what she knows (she specialises in refugee law) and to provide a twist that is not even related to the story.

    Not remembering who was who for a big enough part of the read, aligned with the fact that nothing interesting actually happened, often caused my attention to drift. The events mentioned in the blurb do not take place until well after half of the book (and I feel cheated in that sense, I hate spoilers) and the ending is quite abrupt. The big teacher’s secret is anti-climatic and there really isn’t anything I could hang on to.
    I almost wish Terry really had turned out to be a paedophile so that Laurie’s character had not been made so closed-minded and really one-dimensional, and we had had some form of twist to make it all worth while.

    The strength of this book is the portrayal of a small coastal town, which is quite vivid and engaging, and each character, who has their own stuff to deal with, if you can keep up with the plethora of them.
    However, as I finish the book I am left clueless as to what it was supposed to achieve and just a ‘well okay then’ feeling.

    Disclaimer: I would like to thank the publisher and Netgalley for providing me a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

    Read from May 22nd to May 29th, 2017
    GR Review

    My Sister’s Bones

    Title: My Sister’s Bones

    Author: Nuala Ellwood

    Genres: Mystery | Thriller

    Length: 400 pages | 3605 Kindle locations

    Source: Netgalley

    Publisher: Penguin UK

    Publishing Date: March 28th, 2017

    Rating: 3.5/5

    Premise:

    Sisters Kate and Sally have been estranged for years. When their mother passes away and Kate returns to her hometown, she is faced with all the memories of her childhood and her sister’s degradation.
    Sally has become an alcoholic and her husband Paul thinks only Kate can help her. Can she do it? And if so, will she keep her sanity?

    Review:

    My Sister’s Bones features the mother of all unreliable main characters. Our Kate is a war reporter and to say she has skeletons in her closet is and understatement.

    In Part 1, the narrative advances between current events, where Kate is locked up, and the previous week’s, when she returned to her hometown after her mother’s passing. As the story advances we find that Kate refuses to deal with her hallucinations, a result of witnessing such horrors, and that several bad things have happened both recently and as Kate was growing up.

    During that first part I found some things quite repetitive and Kate annoyed me both in past and current accounts. Her insistence that the interviewer must not realise the truth about her state of mind particularly irked me because it seemed obvious to me that she needed help.

    Towards the end of part 1, about halfway through the book, things start to get interesting and in Part two the narrative is done by a different character. After that I was really invested and wanted to know what came next.

    So I didn’t find the stuff that happened in the first half that interesting and I actually had to fight the urge to skim through the text because the unreliability of the character was taken to extreme. I didn’t know what the heck was going on. On the other hand, I found myself exhausted by the book. All the characters and situations were so dismaying.

    I had anticipated some of what happened or at least who was responsible but I was still quite surprised at a few revelations.

    A solid 3.5 stars.

    Disclaimer: I would like to thank the publisher and Netgalley for providing me a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

    Read from May 18th to May 21th, 2017
    GR Review