New on Pinterest and Instagram

As part of my pursuit to use social media more actively I have created accounts in Pinterest and Instagram.

I haven’t done much with them yet but I have to admit I really like Pinterest’s boards, they are very handy, and the stuff I find there is quite inspirational. Sometimes I misclick and add stuff to the wrong board though and I find it difficult to remove the pins from there, especially on the app!

Instagram seems cool as well and I hope I will be posting more when I get my new phone (whenever that will be)! Not sure I can create pictures nearly as beautiful as the ones I see around, I don’t think I have that good an eye for that kind of stuff, but we’ll see where the journey takes me.

Things are getting busier at work but hopefully I will be able to take some time to explore both, eventually.

In the meantime, if you have any tips please let me know and please feel free to add me, I will follow back:

Thank you!

The Breakdown

Title: The Breakdown

Author: B.A. Paris

Genres: Psychological Thriller

Length: 336 pages | 3364 Kindle locations

Source: Netgalley

Publisher: St. Martin’s Press

Publishing Date: June 20th, 2017
 
Rating: 2.5/5

Premise:

During a storm, Cass makes a decision not to assist a woman whose car appears to have broke down in of a deserted road in the middle of the woods.
That decision will chase her for the rest of her life.
Also, why is she experiencing memory loss?
Can the two be connected?

Review:

I could tell based on ratings that this is one of those books that people either love or hate. Though I didn’t hate it, I could have done without reading it.

I had a lot of trouble with suspension of disbelief. I struggled to stay interested in the narrative when our main character has so serious memory issues that she just chooses to ignore because she is afraid. She goes through stuff, worries about her state of mind, vents to her husband, and that’s it. She is obviously distraught but neither her husband nor best friend seem to realise it or if they do they just downplay it and shrug it off. And she never turns to anyone else.

So for at least three quarters of the book we are presented with situation after situation where Cass can’t remember things right. And it’s not like there was much of an end goal in sight other than time to go back to work approaching, but even that isn’t mentioned much. So it all felt rather pointless.

It annoyed me because the writing was very engaging, other than the whining protagonist, and I was sure that by the time the book ended it would all make sense and wrap up nicely – which it did. But there was nothing during the large majority of the book to make me interested in what happened. It was just… stuff, you know?

I wonder how much longer the book would have gone on had our main character not stumbled upon the truth accidentally, or rather had it handed to her (literally). Also, it doesn’t make sense that Rachel would tell her about the row in the parking lot. Or that she didn’t mention it to the police when interviewed. With so much at stake it just doesn’t make sense that she would mention that. There’s just too much fitting it too perfectly and we are supposed to believe that it was Jane guiding the events?

So I am still struggling to figure out the point of everything up until that point, which felt rushed due to all the luck involved.

Also, for so long we are presented to this scared person who just gives in. And yet she has the mind to plot all that after she finds out. Even after confessing she was scared to death she wouldn’t make it through the night. It just doesn’t make sense!

As you can see, there isn’t much I can say about why I am not a fan of this book without writing spoilers so I will just say that The Breakdown has its qualities, for sure, particularly the writing, and it is quite different from what is out there. However, as far as the story and characters go I was just not content.

Disclaimer: I would like to thank the publisher and Netgalley for providing me a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

Read from Mar 16th to Mar 19th, 2017
GR Review

Stacking The Shelves [6] March 18th

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Stacking The Shelves is hosted at Tynga’s Reviews and is all about sharing the books you are adding to your shelves, may it be physical or virtual. This means you can include books you buy in physical store or online, books you borrow from friends or the library, review books, gifts and of course ebooks!


Hello, everyone!
I hope you are all having a lovely weekend.
So… Last week I went overboard with requests so I really tried to brace myself this week.
I did request more but only 3 ARCs were approved and finally received the 3 books I had ordered from BWB.
These are the books I added to my shelves:


Edelweiss ARC

Red Ribbons (Dr. Kate Pearson #1) by Louise Phillips

Red Ribbons (Dr. Kate Pearson #1)
by Louise Phillips

This British crime novel seems really interesting. A serial killer who leaves red ribbons and a criminal psychologist who tries to get in the killer’s mind – I would say this is a recipe for success.

Netgalley ARC

Lie to Me: A gripping psychological thriller with a shocking twist by Jess Ryder

Lie to Me
by Jess Ryder

Despite the annoying mention of the shocking twist the premise sounded very interesting. I wonder what story a four-year-old could be asked to tell and what devastating questions that action could have…

Augustus Carp, Esq., by Himself by Henry Howarth Bashford

Augustus Carp, Esq., by Himself
by Henry Howarth Bashford

The description of a a self-proclaimed “good man” who relishes every opportunity to condemn the weaknesses of others while excusing his own failings completely grasped me. This sounds very funny and real, just what I need to wind down from all the heavy stuff I read.
Unfortunately I am unable to read it as it is in ACSM format and will just not deliver to my Kindle.

Purchases

My lovely books from Better World Books have arrived and they all look amazing! Neither has a cover even remotely bent, they just had stickers and stamps from having belonged to a library. I easily removed the stickers so they look even more gorgeous now.

I have been wanting to buy 0.4 and 1.4 by Mike Lancaster in this edition, for many months now, because I love the covers but I just could find them.
After being hypnotised, Kyle Straker wakes up to a whole different world and people don’t even seem to realise he exists. I am very curious and looking forward to reading both books.

A Child Called It is not something I would usually read because even though I am used to reading heavy stuff it is all fiction, so let’s see how I will cope with this one.


And that’s it for this week!

Have you read any of these or do you plan to?

Are you excited about reading any particular books you got this week?

Please comment below and if you have a STS post please post it in comments.

I Found You

Title: I Found You

Author: Lisa Jewell

Genres: Mystery | Thriller

Length: 464 pages | 3525 Kindle locations

Source: Netgalley

Publisher: Arrow

Publishing Date: March 9th, 2017

 

Rating: 3.5/5

Premise:

In East Yorkshire, Alice, a single mother of three, finds a man sitting on the beach in the middle of the pouring rain wearing nothing but a shirt and jeans. Against her better judgement, she takes him in, after finding out that he does not remember who he is.
At the same time, at Surrey, Lily’s husband goes missing. They have only been married for a couple of weeks and she does not know much about him but she knows he would not just leave like this.
Who is this lost man and how does his past relate to the two stories?

Review:

I Found You started out really well. The writing was very engaging.

I found myself enjoying the chapters about Alice more because she seemed more real, even though she was obviously a bit off in the head:
And even if (…) he’s killed someone, he’d have a good reason for it; she knows he would.
Often saying she knew she was didn’t exactly help, it was just stating the obvious.
It was that realising things well before the character did that threw me off a bit. I mean, it took her forever to really grasp that she was putting her children’s life in danger by bringing in a complete stranger.

There were things that didn’t add up like how on earth she could support herself and three children and an unexpected guest just by selling her art occasionally.
Still, I enjoyed several aspects of this character, particularly her parents and everything she needed to deal with. It was refreshing to read about 40 year-old characters, their daily lives and concerns.

Lily on the other hand, I struggled to relate to. I just don’t get why a 21-year-old would move to another country, without money, without family, not even knowing her fiancé’s family or really much about him – or anyone else in that country, for that matter. It just didn’t seem realistic, fully relying on a single person to survive. And not having any money because Carl payed for everything? Nah, just doesn’t seem feasible. And, again, it took her forever to realise what I had grasped within a few lines.

I did appreciate viewing things at a foreigner’s point of view, since I am not native to the English culture and do find myself wondering about stuff that is so familiar to them.

After that, we get introduced to more characters – brother Gray, sister Kirstie and mysterious Mark – and things get even more interesting. The way the chapters ended made me want to know what came next and I looked forward to finding out how all three storylines would progress.

The way that we are told they are two separate missing men is very well achieved, with innocuous clues here and there. And even the whole memory loss thing, which is so popular in psychological thrillers these days, was quite convincing.

I did anticipate most of the revelations but as the book’s end approached I was surprised on a couple of occasions and appreciate how it wrapped up to the book’s title in the final lines – these days, often times I find myself wondering how a book’s title was picked. Most of them are just so generic. No wonder I can’t remember most titles when thinking of a particular character or storyline. I think this one, simple as it is, will stick with me.

As a note, the ARC’s quality was a disappointment. I am used to not having a chapter index but incomplete words were a first. Sometimes letters were missing in the middle of words, other times the beginning or end, and I had to guess based on context. Most times I could do that, others not so much.

All in all, I Found You was quite enjoyable. Not the most amazing thriller I have read but very enjoyable and I wanted to know what happened to all characters. Recommended.

Disclaimer: I would like to thank the publisher and Netgalley for providing me a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

Read from Mar 11th to Mar 16th, 2017
GR Review

STEPHEN KING: The desk (Article and Comic Visual)…

For all SK fans out there.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Think about this:

Stephen King has been releasing one, sometimes two books a year pretty much every year since his first novel, Carrie, was published in 1974. That’s 43 freakin’ years of consistent output! He’s become such a mainstay of our culture that it’s easy to take his genius for granted.

King’s been writing since he was 7 years-old, when he would copy and rearrange the stories out of his favourite comic books.

Impressed by her son’s talent, King’s mother urged him to write an original story.

He began submitting short stories to horror and sci-fi magazines at age 12 and would use a nail hammered into the wall above his typewriter to hold all his rejection letters.

By the time he was 14, the nail wouldn’t hold the weight of the letters anymore and King had to replace it with a larger spike.

By the time he was 16…

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Random Chat: Where Do You Read?

Where Do You Read?

Step up, take a seat, make yourself at home and let’s chat!

Besides snuggling up at home, my favourite places to read…

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… are definitely…

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… near nature.

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But the fact is I will read anywhere.

And I mean anywhere

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Regardless of whether there are people around or not, I always take my book with me.

Do you do this as well or is there any situation you can think of that you will not take your book along?

And where do you prefer to read?

Time for some Laffs – The Double Entendre and a touch Risque!

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Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Welcome to some laffs.. a little on the risque side as some might say.. or it might be your mind!  My thanks to a number of contibutors today who I hope won’t mind that I have taken their names in vain.. Enjoy..

Little Bruce and Little Jenny from Tina Frisco – https://tinafrisco.com/

Little Bruce and little Jenny are only 10 years old, but they know they are in love. One day they decide they want to get married, so Bruce goes to Jenny’s father to ask him for her hand. Bruce bravely walks up to him and says, “Mr. Smith, me and Jenny are in love, and I want to ask you for her hand in marriage.”

Thinking this was just the cutest thing, Mr. Smith replies, “Well, Bruce, you are only 10. Where will you two live?”

Without hesitating, Bruce replies, “In Jenny’s room. It’s bigger than mine and…

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