On the Other Hand: The Little Anthology of Big Questions

On the Other Hand: The Little Anthology of Big Questions
by Renée Paule

Title: On the Other Hand: The Little Anthology of Big Questions

Author: Renée Paule

Genres: Non-Fiction

Length: 216 pages

Source: GoodReads First Reads

Publisher: RPG Publishing

Publishing Date: October 1st 2014

Rating: N/A

Three years later, I am once again a First Reads winner. Unfortunately I was not able to finish this book. I actually did not get past maybe a third of it, I don’t really know.

I dove into a major reading slump in large part because of it, since I found it incredibly pointless and even depressing but felt the obligation to post my review. I think it’s safe to say that after three months I do not intend to pick it back up.

I am going to try and find other books that interest me, to see if I can focus on making reading enjoyable again. Other folks may find this book quite thought-provoking so do feel free to give it a try, it’s just not for me.

Read from Feb 3rd to –
GR Review

I would like to thank the author for providing a free copy of this book through GoodReads First Reads program in exchange for my honest review.

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A Child Called “It” (Dave Pelzer #1)

Title: A Child Called “It” (Dave Pelzer #1)

Author: Dave Pelzer

Genres: Biography | Non-Fiction

Length: 184 pages

Source: Book Depository

Format: Paperback

Rating: 3/5

Premise:

This is the account of Dave Pelzer’s life growing up with his alcoholic mother’s constant abuse.

Review:

When I first got this I didn’t realize it was part of a trilogy. It is difficult to assess it as a solo book, because I am sure there is much more to Dave’s story and since it is less than 200 pages I am unsure why it wasn’t all put together.

It is a highly disturbing book and it is so hard to accept that this was part of the day-to-day life of this boy, as unfortunately so many others. This wasn’t just abuse and neglect, it was blatant torture.
For its message, because it is an account that needs to be told, it should be out there and people need to be sensitized to it.

However, I have to say that, as a story, I was disappointed because it felt disjointed. There were lots of gaps when something must have changed to make David’s parents change as well and we’re left in the dark to that, as well as the changes in David himself. I craved for an account of a moment when David realized he was changing, something to make it more real.

While I sympathize that young David must have known why things were happening either either, this is his account as an adult, and I believe it would have helped the reader immensely, not only to connect with him more but also to make us think that it could happen to anyone, and that maybe when we see something behaving a certain way or going through certain experiences we should pay closer attention.

So that is the issue I had with this, but as I said, it’s a book that needs to be read. There are certainly many children out there going through this, and they don’t understand what is happening to them, or really believe they are a bad child and deserve what is happening to them.

Read from Oct 9th to Oct 17th, 2017
GR Review

Lady Killers

Title: Lady Killers: A Compendium

Author: Tori Telfer

Genres: Biography | Non-fiction | True Crime

Length: 336 pages | 5772 Kindle locations

Source: Edelweiss

Publisher: Harper Perennial

Publishing Date: October 10th 2017

Rating: 2.5/5

Premise:

A compendium of the tales of 14 female serial killers.

Review:

I am still mulling over why I didn’t enjoy this more. A book about female serial killers is surely innovative and I am a sucker for the twisted human mind. After so much fiction about this topic, I was thrilled to begin a non-fiction, realistic account.

The writing is engaging and witty and the author brings the right amount of humour to balance the wickedness in those pages.

However, that said humour, paired with the fact that none of the women portrayed were contemporary, bought an air of myth to the narrative that did not help prove the author’s point – that women could be just as wicked as men -, because it felt that there wasn’t much substantial proof behind it. The events in these women’s stories were studied long after the acts, and there were plenty of rumours as well. So, I don’t know, I guess my main issue is that it did not feel very ‘real’ to me.

The one story that chilled me the most was the most current one, the Giggling Grannie. I could definitely picture such a character and it chilled me to the bone – even more than reading about women who poisoned men or children in the dark ages or a couple of centuries after.

Also, constantly reading about poison grew tiresome and at some point I struggled to keep reading. I began to wonder if I would ever finish the book.

All in all, Lady Killers was an interesting read, but I would have enjoyed it more had the cases been more contemporary.

Disclaimer: I would like to thank the publisher and Edelweiss for providing me a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

Read from Apr 1st to Apr 7th, 2017
GR Review